Tag Archives: mobile app

Easy Source Code Clean Up on Mobile App Design Best Practices Mobile Gov Wiki Page

Closed tapas taskTapas: Please remove the SPAN tag formatting from the source code on the Mobile Gov Wiki page Mobile App Design Best Practices.

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Solve the Outbreak (Mobile) Application from CDC

Get clues about outbreaks, analyze the case and save lives in a fun engaging iPad app from CDC.

Introducing CDC’s new iPad app: Solve the Outbreak (Where you get to be the disease detective!)

New outbreaks happen every day and CDC’s disease detectives are on the front lines, working 24/7 to save lives and protect people. When a new outbreak happens, disease detectives are sent in to figure out how outbreaks are stared, before they can spread. In our new, free iPad app, you get to Solve the Outbreak.

In this interactive, engaging app, you get to decide what to do: Do you quarantine the village? Talk to the people who are sick? Ask for more lab results? The better your answers, the higher your score – and the more quickly you’ll save lives. You’ll start out as a Trainee and will earn badges by solving cases, with the goal of earning the top rank: Disease Detective.

Fun to play and learn

Perfect for teens, young adults, and public health nerds of all ages, Solve the Outbreak is a great way to take the study of epidemiology outside the classroom.

  • Learn about diseases and outbreaks in an engaging way.
  • See how disease detectives save lives around the world.
  • Try your hand at solving an outbreak.
  • Post your scores on Facebook or Twitter and challenge your friends to do better!

Reposted from CDC.gov.

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Taking Open Government to the Next Level

“I want us to ask ourselves every day, how are we using technology to make a real difference in people’s lives?” President Obama posed this question as a challenge to federal agencies, and we’ve taken that challenge seriously at the Labor Department.

On a personal level, I’m hardly a “techie” − but I appreciate how technology has made my life better in so many ways. That’s why I want to share some of the behind-the-scenes work of my agency, the department’s Office of Public Affairs, in the area of technical innovation.

mobile applicationFirst, it’s important to understand application programming interfaces, known as APIs. (Here’s a great explanation.) The easiest way to think about APIs is that they allow developers in the public and private sectors to build apps, widgets and websites based on government data. Anyone with development skills and a little creativity can use an API to tap into an agency’s data and repackage it as a useful smartphone app or other tool.

Since we published a department-wide API two years ago, developers across the country have used it to create apps that educate users about workplace safety and health, employers’ compliance with wage and hour laws, and improving employment opportunities for disabled workers, just to name a few!

Releasing data through an API was a big step forward, but it was not exactly groundbreaking.  However, since then, my team has been working hard to develop software development kits that are truly innovative because they make using our API even easier.

These kits (also known as SDKs) contain application code for six different platforms − iOS, Android, Blackberry, .Net, PHP and Ruby − that anyone creating a mobile or Web-based app using our data could incorporate. By using the kits, experienced developers will save time and novice developers will be able to work with DOL data in just a few minutes.

And that’s not all − our innovation went a step further. Other federal agencies have their own APIs, and for a variety of technical and business reasons, many have very different requirements for using their APIs. Mike Pulsifer, a federal employee in my office, together with contractors Chuck Brouse, Patrick Johnson and Wendell Hatcher, just finished updating our kits to work with APIs across the federal government. Now developers can easily combine data from the Labor Department with data from 26 other agencies and multi-agency programs. That’s a lot of data!

All of these kits can be downloaded from our developer site. Additionally, in keeping with the federal digital government strategy, each has been published as an open source project ongithub, a popular code-sharing site. For a list of federal APIs that are supported by our kits, check the github repository’s wiki page. This list will be updated as the kits are tested with additional federal APIs.

Our work is helping the government be more efficient and keep up with constantly changing technology. But most importantly, investing in this kind of technology to create a more open government is a priority for us because it empowers you. As the president has said, “we must never forget who our customers are − the American people.”

Reblogged from the Department of Labor’s (Work in Progress) blog.

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Job Search Tools are Going Mobile


Searching for jobs on a mobile phone
The Labor Department’s Employment and Training Administration has a number of great online tools to help Americans find new employment or learn new skills from training providers in their community. In the past year alone, more than 40 million people have accessed these tools from their desktops. However, as technology changes, more and more people are using mobile/phone-based browsers to conduct the majority of their Web browsing. The department’s online resources are changing to keep up with the rapid growth and increased use of these devices and systems.

This week, we’ve made some of our most popular online tools available as mobile-optimized websites. These mobile sites give smartphone or tablet users quick access to key job search and training resources. Users can:

  • Locate and contact the American Job Center closest to them.
  • Conduct a Job Search by searching local job listings throughout the entire United States. Job listings are updated daily and can be searched by job type or keyword as well as by city, state or ZIP code.
  • Perform a Veterans Job Search to match military job experience to civilian careers, and then view local job listings for those careers. Users can search by their military job title or their occupational classification (MOC/MOS) code and can view job listings by city, state or ZIP code.
  • Browse the Salary Finder, which provides average hourly wages or annual salaries by occupation and location. The data come from the Occupational Employment Statistics program of the department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • Search the Training Finder for education and training programs in a specific area. Users can search by occupation, program or school, and then find contact information for the relevant program.

These changes are part of the department’s ongoing efforts to make workforce resources more open and accessible to the communities who need them most, and to ensure that job seekers have a range of tools at their fingertips.

Reblogged from Work in Progress, The Official Blog of the U.S. Department of Labor.

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Have Your Say! NARA needs your input on Digital Strategy!

This entry was reblogged from the NARAtions blog.

On May 23, 2012, the White House released the Digital Government Strategy, which outlines how all federal agencies will work to make information and services easily accessible on the internet, anytime, anywhere, and on any device. President Barack Obama said,

“Ultimately, this Strategy will ensure that agencies use emerging technologies to serve the public as effectively as possible. As a government, and as a trusted provider of services, we must never forget who our customers are – the American people.”

At the National Archives, we are working to make our data and information available to you.

Weigh in and let us know what you’d like us to focus on.
We’ve developed two lists. The first list is for proposed services to optimize for mobile use, so you can better access these services via a smartphone, tablet, or another mobile device. The second list is for systems to enable via Web Services like APIs, so that the data will be more accessible, especially for developers to reuse. Candidates were selected based on the possibility of implementation by May 2013. Please also let us know what additional candidates you would like to see optimized for mobile or enabled via APIs in the future.

In the comments below, please let us know what you would like to prioritized and specific recommendations for what will be most useful to you. If you prefer, you can email your recommendations to opengov@nara.gov.

To learn more about the agency’s implementation of the Digital Government Strategy, please visit archives.gov/digitalstrategy andarchives.gov/open.

Proposed Mobile Candidates:

  • Mobile optimize FederalRegister.gov.
  • Develop a mobile application based on the Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents.
  • Mobile optimize Archives.gov.
  • Mobile optimize the Online Public Access resource, the online public portal for National Archives records.
  • Make additional National Archives records available through Wikipedia, which is mobile optimized and available through mobile apps.
  • Make additional National Archives records available through Flickr, which is mobile optimized and available through mobile apps.
  • Make improvements to Today’s Document mobile application.
  • Make improvements to the mobile application for DocsTeach, an online educational resource featuring National Archives records.
Proposed API Candidates:
  • Integration of Regulations.gov API into FederalRegister.gov and its API. This integration would provide greater access to public comments and supporting documents in Regulations.gov, and improve process for submitting public comments from FederalRegister.gov to Regulations.gov.
  • Expand the FederalRegister.gov API to include the “Public Inspection Desk.”
  • Develop an API for FDsys through the Office of Federal Register – Government Printing Office Partnership.
  • Develop an API for the Online Public Access resource, the online public portal for National Archives records.
  • Make additional National Archives records available through Wikipedia,  which is accessible through the MediaWiki API.
  • Make additional National Archives records available through Flickr, which is accessible through the Flickr API.

Please leave your comments for NARA on the original NARAtions blog post.

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