GSA Greens the Federal Government

From energy and water efficient buildings, to a fuel efficient  fleet, to smarter electronics disposal and green acquisitions, GSA is working to ensure that the agency is going green and saving green. Here’s the latest on our efforts to green government:

The Thomas O'Neill Federal Building was built in 1963. This is a photo before the modernization that took place in 2002.
The Thomas O’Neill Federal Building was built in 1963. This is a photo before the modernization that took place in 2002.

Improving Building Performance

Our real estate portfolio owns or leases 9,011 assets, which includes maintaining an inventory of more than 377 million rentable square feet of workspace, and preserving more than 471 historic properties. In a recent issue of Refinishing Touch, GSA’s Chief Greening Officer Eleni Reed discussed how the agency is taking steps to make our portfolio more sustainable in support of the Obama administration’s green goals. Read more here.

GSA Gets Top Marks on Green Scorecard

GSA’s green efforts help combat climate change by mitigating emissions from buildings, fleet, and supply chain. In the long run, this reduces our vulnerability to the impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, heat waves, drought or severe weather events. The agency received top marks on the Office of Management and Budget scorecard, the government’s benchmark to identify and track agencies’ progress toward cutting waste, pollution, and costs in federal operations. Want to learn more? Visit here.

The Thomas O'Neill Building after its moderization that earned it U.S. Green Building Council's New Construction Award.
The Thomas O’Neill Building after its moderization that earned it U.S. Green Building Council’s New Construction Award.

Thomas P. O’Neill Federal Building Wins LEED Award

GSA began modernizing the forty-year-old Thomas P. O’Neill Federal Building in 2002, and the design-build transformation is remarkable in both its details and sustainable attributes. The green upgrades include window bays and high-efficiency curtainwalls, the introduction of two atria, an interior filled with natural light, water-conserving plumbing fixtures, a planted roof, the reuse of more than 95 percent of the structural elements, recycling 93 percent of the construction waste, the conversion of parking to a public open space and the landscaping of 50 percent of the site.

The project has received LEED Platinum certification from U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and just last week, it earned USGBC’s Project of the Year: New Construction Award.